Home Contents Search

Kyle Generations
Home Forum Topics Matter African Generations Adkins/Atkins Generations Brady Generations Butler Generations Calhoun-Wilson Generations Carter Generations Cherokee Generations Clayter/Claytor Generations Cottingham Generations Creek Generations Crosswhite Generations Edwards Generations Finney Generations FlournoyJonesGenerations Frog Generations Funchess Generations Fuqua Generations Hemings Generations Hill Generations Holmes Generations Hughes Generations Hunter Generations Jackson Generations Jefferson Generations Jeffersonian Overview Kennedy Generations Kyle Generations Lee Generations Lee-Banister Generations Lee-Findley Generations Lowry Generations Marshall Generations Martin-Robinson Generations Mary's Message Board McCoy Generations Roberts Generations Seminole Generations Sutton Generations Taliaferro Generations Watts Generations Wayles Generations Wilkerson Generations Williams Generations Woody Generations York Generations West Generations Who We Are Help Wanted

Mary Lee Brady, Ph.D.

Home
William Kyle, born abt 1745
Robert Kyle, born abt 1760
Jeremiah Kyle, born abt 1770
Silvey the African, born abt 1800.

       

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We have determined the surname of Kyle originated in Ayr Shire Province of Scotland, and believe African-Americans using the surname came by it via emigrant Robert Kyle and his descendents.  Indeed, we suspect that Robert Kyle like many others of Scotch-Irish heritage did so in service to the British crown and its endeavors to establish colonies and wealth abroad. 

It is also possible that he was a craftsman seeking to earn a good living via contracted services to rich men like Thomas Jefferson but more likely employed by a trading company such as the one of William and James Donald who were merchant shippers and noted in Thomas Jefferson's Garden Book.  Greenocks is a town in Ayrshire, Scotland.

It is reasonable to assume slaves bought in Africa from one of the English owned slave castles in West Africa were legally acquired merchandise for sale in the English Isles, Caribbean and American colonies, ... until stopped just before 1776 by Lord Chief Justice Mansfield in a court decision that outlawed slavery in England.  Even then, almost two centuries before the famed Brown vs Board of Education decision by Chief Justice Earl Warren of the U.S. Supreme Court, ... some lawyers and merchants had audacity to suggest the court was taking away their God given rights to own or punish slaves; and of course castigated Messianic Christians like Granville Sharp for bringing lawsuits before the British High Court. 

Soldier, sailor, merchant, indentured?  Robert Kyle came to America and by time of his death in 1775 not too far from Thomas Jefferson's Monticello .  He died at the beginning of the American rebellion against the British Empire, ... his sons and daughters too, perhaps, were poised for the great moves westward into more conquered Native American lands and more needs for more African slaves for their bidding, digging, hoeing, chopping, carrying and even sexual pleasures of comely ones. 

Robert KYLE

Sex: M

Event(s)
Birth:  1702
  Kyle, Ayrshire, Scotland
Death:  1775
  Charlottesville, Albemarle, Va

Parents
Father: John William Kyle
 Mother:  

Marriage(s)
 Spouse: Betty Ann Campbell 
 Marriage: Abt 1738 
  , Buckingham, Virginia 

Black and White writers who imagine themselves to be knowledgeable of African-American history but lack definitive insight into African history are akin to experts on Jewish history who are not familiar with the Old Testament.  Indeed, African-American history did not begin in America or for that matter, ... with any single country or place. The easiest insight to read perhaps for beginners is the great book "African Glory" by Dr. J.C. deGraft Johnson, Oxford Scholar of Ghana whose intellectual works were akin to those of Dr. John Hope Franklin and other scholars who have attempted to enlighten the unenlightened to see the light of Truth.  Below is an excerpt from Chapter 16:

We suspect that when and where the first landed estate was established in the colonies was also time and place they acquired slaves, and such would have been acquired via purchase at an auction or given as dowry in the course of marriage by a rich man's daughter. If Betty Ann Campbell came from an established slave owning family, she would have likely included a dowry of at least her maid-servant and maybe slave offspring under six years age. 

We are inclined to believe that by time of his marriage in 1738, Robert Kyle would have had some measure of a landed estate and/or other enterprise of his own.   

Many men who came to the colonies found the trades in horses, whiskey and slaves to be just as rewarding or more so than being the planters of tobacco and other farm products.  Slave trading was a very big business in Maryland and Virginia, ... providing many tens of thousands of hapless souls for ever westward expansion and growth.

Our view is that scholarly processes that exclude African-Americans from American and European histories, ... and then reinsert a special one or two generalized statements or chapters is utterly akin to excluding Jews from European history before the holocaust.

Most of these scholarly writers do not even realize they are doing so because their culture has indoctrinated them to believe African-Americans have no history worthy of being included among the adventures, heroic aspects and other nurturing aspects of White folks like Robert Kyle who apparently sired three White sons and possibly some Black and Mulatto ones in expanding westward to new lands.  Too many thousands of novels and even text books about American history are exactly like a Neil Diamond movie, ... African-Americans simply do not exist as viable human beings in the lives of pioneers, explorers, mountains, valleys and even cities and neighborhoods of American life.

 

Home ] William Kyle, born abt 1745 ] Robert Kyle, born abt 1760 ] Jeremiah Kyle, born abt 1770 ] Silvey the African, born abt 1800. ]

Email:                          Editors, More Mary Matters                                bradyenterpriseassociation@gmail.com
with questions or comments about this web site.
Copyright 2010 Brady Enterprise Association, Inc.
Last modified: 12/29/16